Source: Voices of Youth Count

Source: Voices of Youth Count


According to a national survey, nearly 1 in 4 young Black men, ages 18 to 25, who identified as LGBTQ+ reported explicit homelessness in the last 12 months.


People of color and LGBTQ+ identifying youth are grossly and disproportionately affected by this crisis.


 

More than 3.5 million youth in the US experience homelessness each year.

Estimates show between 27% and 40% of them are LGBTQ+.
 

We scale-up solutions that work to end this crisis.

 

Point Source Youth is a national 501(c)3 dedicated to ending youth homelessness in 50 cities and towns in 10 years.

We help advocate for, implement, and evaluate three proven, scalable, and replicable youth homelessness interventions – family & kinship strengthening, short-term host homes, and rapid re-housing – to increase housing options for youth in our pilot locations. Our mission and local pilot and systems strengthening work is informed by the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) Federal Framework to End Homelessness.

We are currently working in Baltimore, Detroit, Los Angeles, Louisville, New York City, Oakland and San Jose, and adding new pilot locations regularly.


‘…DO WE ALLOW OUR YOUTH TO BE HOMELESS AND SLEEP IN THE STREETS, AND NOT ANYONE CARE FOR THEM? OR DO WE STEP UP AND ACTUALLY DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT—SOMETHING MEANINGFUL?’

Listen to activist and trans youth policy advocate Sophie Cadle talk about why it’s so important for transgender, non-conforming, and non-binary youth to be included in the fight to end youth homelessness.!


 Source: Voices of Youth Count

Source: Voices of Youth Count

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#WontBe
Erased


 
 


As the Department of Health and Human Services attempts to narrowly 'define' gender as what is assigned at birth, we continue to say #wontbeerased! The humanity of transgender, non-binary and non-conforming people is not in question, and not up for debate. Watch our extended interview with Sophie Cadle and why she fights for TGNCNB youth—who experience some of the highest rates of homelessness, poverty, and violence.


THEMES THAT ARE CRITICAL TO ENDING THE YOUTH HOMELESSNESS CRISIS:

  • Put youth in the center of their lives. Give them what they say they need.

  • Create low barrier programs that house youth first and unconditionally.

  • Kicking out young people from programs is a bad idea.

  • Youth need housing. They also need control and ownership of their housing.

  • Youth need support. They are also the people best equipped to determine what supports they need.

  • How can we leverage and utilize extended family, chosen family, and community networks better? How can we have thousands of host homes throughout the country?

  • Finally, can we think differently to do more and do it better? Can we give youth cash? What barriers can we remove? Can we connect youth to more effective housing and supports faster? Why are there waiting lists?